Members wishing to contact any of these practitioners, please consult your Yearbook for contact information.  Non-members, please use the Contact Us page and indicate the person you are seeking to contact in the Comments section.


BONSAI

The Japanese art form using miniature trees grown in containers. Similar practices exist in other cultures, including the Chinese tradition of penjing from which the art originated, and the miniature living landscapes of Vietnamese hòn non bo. The Japanese tradition dates back over a thousand years, and has its own aesthetics and terminology.

DANG, Thanh-ha
LOCKETT, Barbara


BONSEKI
– SAND PAINTING

Bonseki is the art of creating a landscape on a black rectangular or oval lacquer tray using white sand, pebbles, and small rocks. Bon means “tray” and seki means “rock,” so bonseki translates as “tray with rocks.”

UYEDA, Kiyoko


CERAMICS

AMERAU, Carla
ANDREWS, Bev (raku and wood fired)
BALKUS, Daiva
BURK, Mary
FEDORUK, Rosalie
PETERSEN, Kyoko
REARDON, Jeanne


CHANOYU – TEA CEREMONY

The Japanese tea ceremony, also called the Way of Tea, is a Japanese cultural activity involving the ceremonial preparation and presentation of matcha (powdered green tea). The manner in which it is performed, or the art of its performance, is called (o)temae.   Zen Buddhism was a primary influence in the development of the Japanese tea ceremony

SHIMIZU, Motoko


JAPANESE LANDSCAPE DESIGN & ARCHITECTURE

SOROKINA, Ellina (design)


MARTIAL ARTS

Judo meaning “gentle way” is a modern martial art, combat and Olympic sport created in Japan. Its most prominent feature is its competitive element, where the objective is to either throw or take down an opponent to the ground, immobilize or otherwise subdue an opponent with a pin, or force an opponent to submit with a joint lock or a choke.

Naginata is a type of fencing using a wooden pole with a curved single-edged blade on the end.


MEDITATION AND HEALING ARTS

BACH, Savitri
BERRY, Elizabeth (reiki)


NIHON BUYŌ
(Japanese classical dance)

Buyõ is a traditional Japanese performing art, a mixture of dance and pantomime, which emerged in the early Edo period (early 17th century) from earlier traditions. While performed independently by specialists, it is particularly conspicuous as the style of dancing performed by geisha.

KASA, Susan


OBI FOLDING

NEWMAN, Jane


ORIGAMI

Origami is the art of paper folding, which is often associated with Japanese culture. In modern usage, the word “origami” is used as an inclusive term for all folding practices, regardless of their culture of origin. The goal is to transform a flat sheet square of paper into a finished sculpture through folding and sculpting techniques. Modern origami practitioners generally discourage the use of cuts, glue, or markings on the paper.

SHIMIZU, Motoko


SHODŌ
(calligraphy)

Japanese calligraphy was influenced by Zen thought. For any particular piece of paper, the calligrapher has but one chance to create with the brush. The brush strokes cannot be corrected, and even a lack of confidence shows up in the work. The calligrapher must concentrate and be fluid in execution.

OTANI,Mitsuko
REDDEN, Yasue
ROPER, Kathy


PAINTING

Sumi-e is the Japanese word for Black Ink Painting. East Asian Painting and writing developed together in ancient China using the same materials —brush and ink on paper. Emphasis is placed on the beauty of each individual stroke of the brush. The Chinese speak of “writing a painting” and “painting a poem.” A great painting was judged on three elements: the calligraphy strokes, the words of the poetry and the ability of the painting strokes to capture the spirit of nature rather than a photographic likeness. The artists of Japan, Korea and Malaysia learned from the Chinese and then developed their own versions of East Asian brush painting.

DANG, Thanh-ha (sumi-e)
DUTT, Supriya (sumi-e)
LEE, Marie (nihonga)
ROPER, Kathy (nihon-e)
UYEDA, Kiyoko (sumi-e, suibokuga)

 

 

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